Visiting New England: A Look at America’s History

I’ve taken a rather lengthy break from this blog, mostly because I’ve been travelling and managing deadlines with other writing projects. While on this hiatus, I had the chance to visit a dear friend from high school. We spent a few months planning out the trip because that’s who we are: we like outlines and … Continue reading Visiting New England: A Look at America’s History

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Eye Miniatures by Fatima Ronquillo

See this work on the "Learn About Art" page The Artist: Who is Fatima Ronquillo? Born in the Philippines in 1976, Fatima Ronquillo is a self-taught contemporary artist whose work evokes memories of childhood fairy tales. When she was eleven years old, she and her family immigrated to San Antonio, Texas. She now works out … Continue reading Eye Miniatures by Fatima Ronquillo

Is It Collusion? Talking about “Women Collaborators” and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

*This post contains book & film spoilers Last week, anyone with a Netflix account and a love for Annie Barrows’ and Mary Ann Shaffer’s novel was jumping for joy. The adaptation starring half the Downton Abbey cast (Lily James, Jessica Brown Findlay, Matthew Goode, and Penelope Wilton) premiered, and I can safely say that I … Continue reading Is It Collusion? Talking about “Women Collaborators” and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Maria Cristina de Borbon Dos Sicilias by Vicente Lopéz, 1830

See this work on the "Learn About Art" page.     The Artist: Who Was Vicente López? Born in Valencia, Spain in 1772, Vicente López made a name for himself as one of the best portrait artists of the 18th century. At the tender age of thirteen, Vicente began his formal training  in painting under the tutelage … Continue reading Maria Cristina de Borbon Dos Sicilias by Vicente Lopéz, 1830

Under the Tuscan Sun: Frances Mayes’ Fascination with the Etruscans

Six bug bites and a strange sunburn later, I’ve returned from vacation. In the stifling (yet somehow comforting) moist heat of the Caribbean I read Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes. I packed this beautiful sienna and vermilion book into my carry on with the hopes that I would love it as much as … Continue reading Under the Tuscan Sun: Frances Mayes’ Fascination with the Etruscans

Who’s That Girl? Édouard Manet’s Bar Maid and Parisian Prostitution

*this post contains nudity* Édouard Manet was a French painter and notable figure in the transition from realism to impressionism. He is, perhaps, best known for his last major work entitled “A Bar at the Folies Bergère,” which was completed in 1882. The painting is beset with deep blue hues and a forlorn female subject … Continue reading Who’s That Girl? Édouard Manet’s Bar Maid and Parisian Prostitution

“A Quick Temper, Sharp Tongue, and Restless Spirit”: Jo March Seeks Emancipation in Little Women

Louisa May Alcott is often considered synonymous with her most famous protagonist, Josephine March. The comparison is drawn most prominently because of their mutual dedication to writing. More than that, they were each forced into exploiting their greatest passion for the sake of survival. While the Marchs live in genteel poverty, the Alcotts were comparatively … Continue reading “A Quick Temper, Sharp Tongue, and Restless Spirit”: Jo March Seeks Emancipation in Little Women

How Do We Feel About Jeremy Thorpe? A Brief Review of A Very English Scandal

Hugh Grant, England’s quintessential bad boy, has risen to a new level of storytelling. His slope-eyed face and easy wit has drawn me in since Bridget Jones. But there’s something about Grant’s most recent dramatis persona that simultaneously fascinates and repels me. Last Thursday, Amazon Prime released A Very English Scandal, based on the novel … Continue reading How Do We Feel About Jeremy Thorpe? A Brief Review of A Very English Scandal

Claire Fraser Becomes a Doctor: Medical Education and Developments from 18th Century Scotland to 20th Century America

Since the premiere of the Starz adaptation of Outlander in 2014, Diana Gabaldon’s series has become a global phenomenon. First published in 1991, the once niche group of readers has had to cope with sharing their love for Jamie Fraser with millions of other fans. My introduction to the series began with my friend’s insistence that … Continue reading Claire Fraser Becomes a Doctor: Medical Education and Developments from 18th Century Scotland to 20th Century America

“She’s most respectably behaved, though foreign and strange in her manners”: Analyzing Hester and Ameerah from Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Making of a Marchioness

*This post contains spoilers* Neither imperialism nor colonialism is a simple act of accumulation and acquisition. Both are supported and perhaps even impelled by impressive ideological formations that include notions that certain territories and people require and beseech domination, as well as forms of knowledge affiliated with domination: the vocabulary of classic nineteenth-century imperial culture … Continue reading “She’s most respectably behaved, though foreign and strange in her manners”: Analyzing Hester and Ameerah from Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Making of a Marchioness